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2021

2021 NFL Draft Big Board: Offensive Tackle

With the NFL Draft season upon us, it is time to begin my draft process. In this article, I will be ranking the 2021 Draft classes offensive tackles that I’ve taken a good look at so far. Anyways, let’s get started with the number one offensive tackle on my big board.

#1. Penei Sewell, Oregon

Pros

  • Ideal frame at 6’6, 330 lbs. There is no official measurement on his wingspan, but it’s a clear plus.
  • Explosive athleticism.
  • Incredible movement in space for a guy his size. He moves laterally, changes direction, and gets to the next level with ease. He moves like a tight end.
  • Very quick foot speed. He’s very light on his feet.
  • Necessary strength for an NFL offensive tackle.
  • Quick out of his stance.
  • Deals out bruising hits when he has momentum.
  • Can thrive in any scheme.
  • Was extremely productive throughout his entire college football career despite playing at such a young age.
  • Just turned 20 years old in October and he still played 2 seasons at Oregon.

Cons

  • Hand placement could get more consistent.
  • He tends to slow his feet down after his third, sometimes second step in pass protection.
  • Plays too upright on occasion. This led to him getting bull rushed a few times at Oregon.

Player Overview

When you watch Penei Sewell on tape, you immediately understand the hype around this kid. Despite being so young, Sewell is already an extremely productive left tackle with a very well-rounded arsenal, and he’s only scratching the surface of his potential. He does need to clean some things up technique wise by becoming a little more consistent in that department, but it’s really all nit-picking. Penei Sewell has “generational” left tackle written all over him.

#2. Christian Darrisaw, Virginia Tech

Pros

  • Moves very well for his size. Provides a lot of versatility for a left tackle. Has no problem as a pull guy, or getting to the second and third levels.
  • Fluid athlete with great flexibility for his position.
  • Elite strength.
  • Finishes blocks really well when he’s in the correct position.
  • Quick feet.
  • Very solid balance.
  • Recovers well after mistakes.
  • Does a good job at getting out of his stance in time.
  • Solid frame at 6’5, 315 lbs with a lengthy wingspan.
  • Great run blocker.

Cons

  • Hand placement is inconsistent. Pass rushers will use swim moves to get right by him when his hand placement is off.
  • His form coming out of his stance is still a bit inconsistent. Sometimes he’ll lunge with the top half of his body, and this leads to him getting bull rushed by opposing defenders.
  • Could do a better job at utilizing his length, especially in space.

Player Overview

Christian Darrisaw has been flying up draft boards as of late, and rightfully so. He has all the athletic tools to keep up with both speed and power rushers in the NFL, and his great run blocking should most definitely translate to the NFL. Technique wise, Darrisaw is still a little raw, but on the reps where his technique is correct, Darrisaw is so hard to get by. This is a guy that I really like, and I see him being a very successful NFL left tackle for years to come.

#3. Samuel Cosmi, Texas

Pros

  • Plays with incredible tenacity. He’s very competitive.
  • He moves well in space. His footwork is solid, and he can get up to the second and third levels with no issues.
  • Ideal height (6’7) and length for a tackle.
  • Possesses excellent patience.
  • Has plenty of experience against a ton of different pass sets.
  • Has college experience as both a left and right tackle. Not too mention, he plays both positions at a high level.

Cons

  • Needs to gain more strength. He’s currently listed at 310 lbs, but he lacks muscle and his frame clearly has room for more weight.
  • Not quick out of his stance. Too often he’s one of, if not the last player off the ball.
  • He’s knocked off balance too often. This occurs mainly when he’s hit with a good power move, or when he’s too slow out of his stance.
  • Hand placement is still very inconsistent. On occasion, his hands were too high on opposing pass rushers, or his hands were too low in his load up for a punch.
  • Overall, he’s a solid run blocker, but he doesn’t create a ton of space. He’s more of a “catcher” at the second level that just stays in front of his guy, rather than aggressively striking at his opponent.

Player Overview

From solid right tackle to standout left tackle, Samuel Cosmi is a fierce competitor that has taken big strides in his years at Texas. His transition from right to left tackle was as smooth as you could ask for, and as Cosmi continues to gain strength and become more consistent in some technical areas, he’s becoming an even more enticing prospect. With that being said, he still has room to grow. He can still get stronger, and his technique is still raw. All in all, Cosmi is a fairly safe prospect with intriguing upside, and I see him going pretty early in this year’s draft.

#4. Rashawn Slater, Northwestern

Pros

  • Great mobility. He can get to the second level and move across the line of scrimmage with no issues.
  • Smooth footwork.
  • Excellent hand placement.
  • High IQ.
  • Plays with great physicality.
  • He’s got collegiate experience as both a right and left tackle.
  • Played very well against Chase Young in 2019.

Cons

  • Although he is 315 lbs, Slater is just 6’4 with a fairly suspect wingspan. This makes his frame concerning for a tackle.
  • Doesn’t get great leverage against power rushes. His anchor needs work, and he really struggles against guys with larger frames.

Player Overview

Rashawn Slater is a technician at tackle. His technique is next level, his intelligence is superb, and the dude can move in space with no issues. On tape, there aren’t many issues with Slater, but frame makes many people wonder whether or not he’s suited to play tackle in the NFL. People believe his frame is too small and that sliding over to guard would be a much better fit for his frame, and he’d also be able to better utilize his lateral mobility there. With that being said, I believe Slater is capable of playing tackle in the NFL. There’s hardly any holes in his game, and I’m not even sure he has the anchor to play in the interior, at least for now. With that being said, Slater is definitely a high-floor, high-ceiling type of guy that I look at as one of the best offensive tackle prospects in this class.

#5. Liam Eichenberg, Notre Dame

Pros

  • Very solid frame. 6’6, 310 lbs with decent length.
  • Definitely has NFL level strength.
  • Great punch with a lot of power.
  • Great balance and patience.
  • Possesses high-end awareness.
  • Thrives in power schemes.
  • Productive as a run and pass blocker.

Cons

  • Poor lateral movement.
  • Could get stronger in terms of lower-body strength.
  • Not a terrible mover in space, but he’s not the smoothest either. His footwork and hand placement need to improve when on the move.
  • He’s capable in zone blocking schemes, but it’s not his forte. He needs to get a little better in space for me to feel comfortable about this area of his game.

Player Overview

Liam Eichenberg is a senior out of Notre Dame, and although his playstyle would’ve been perfect 5-10 years ago, we’re assessing him as a 2021 prospect, and he’s a prospect that I’m fond of. He’s entering the NFL with a lot of knowledge and experience, and I see a lot more pros than cons with Eichenberg. He’s a very well rounded tackle that needs to continue to improve in space, but I’m confident that he’ll take that next step and prove himself in zone blocking schemes.

#6. Spencer Brown, Northern Iowa

Pros

  • Amazing frame at 6’9, 325 lbs with great length.
  • Great strength.
  • Very solid athlete. He used to play tight end.
  • He’s a good mover in space. He moves with decent fluidity and has no problem getting up to the second level.
  • Finishes blocks well.

Cons

  • Poor leverage against smaller defenders.
  • Footwork could use some improvement.
  • Poor technique on punches.
  • Played right tackle at Northern Iowa, an FCS school (non Power-5). This means he faced fairly lackluster competition in college.
  • He’s a right tackle, not a left tackle. This slightly hinders his value.

Player Overview

Spencer Brown is a tight end turned offensive tackle from the FCS that is currently flying under the radar. His physical stature and attributes are off the charts, giving him a ton of potential to develop into a great tackle. With that being said, it’s clear Brown played poor competition in college. His technique isn’t terrible, but it’s clear he could use some refining in this department as well. With all of this being said, I’m a fan of the upside Spencer Brown brings to the table, and I believe he deserves more recognition ahead of this year’s draft.

#7. Dillon Radunz, North Dakota State

Pros

  • Very fluid athlete. He moves well in space.
  • Fairly quick out of his stance.
  • Great kickslide.
  • Impressive balance and body control.
  • Uses his length to his advantage.
  • Super competitive and physical.
  • Good punch.
  • Great awareness.
  • Superb run blocker.

Cons

  • Hand placement is too high and wide most of the time.
  • As a 300 pound senior, he could gain some more weight.
  • Faced fairly low-end competition. Big questions as to whether or not he can make the jump and handle NFL pass rushers, especially when considering he faced low level competition at an older age.
  • Suffered a season ending knee injury back in 2017.

Player Overview

Dillon Radunz is a prospect that dominated during his time at North Dakota State. Although his hand placement needs work, Radunz checks nearly all the boxes off on tape, and it’s clear that he is being slept on by a lot of people. With that being said, he played low level competition, even as a senior. When you factor that in with his fairly lightweight for a tackle, many question whether or not he can make such a big leap, and rightfully so. Although Radunz is definitely someone I don’t want starting right away due to the transition, his tape is very encouraging, and it’s clear that he can have a very successful career as a starter if he can make the leap. 

#8. Obinna Eze, Memphis

Pros

  • Awesome frame at 6’8, 315 lbs with great length.
  • Experience as both a right and left tackle, although he’s definitely better suited for left tackle.
  • Great footwork.
  • Exceptional athlete for a left tackle.
  • Moves well and does a good job at the point of attack when on the move.
  • Handles speed well.

Cons

  • He lunges too often. His balance is off at times because of this.
  • Hand placement has room to improve.
  • Needs to gain more strength, especially on his anchor. Luckily, his frame still has room for more weight.
  • Poor kickslide.
  • Doesn’t grip onto opposing defenders often enough.
  • Just started playing football a couple of years ago, so he’s still fairly inexperienced.

Player Overview

After moving to America from Nigeria in 2015 for basketball purposes, Obinna Eze quickly found himself on the football field where he clearly had natural talent. In his time at Memphis so far, Eze has proven he’s got the potential to be great, but he’s still got a long way to go. Eze’s blessed with a great frame and exceptional athleticism. He’s a great mover, and he can handle speed very well. With that being said, Eze is still fairly new to the game, so his technique is raw. Despite his eye-popping athleticism, Eze’s poor technique leaves a poor taste in your mouth when watching his film. With that being said, he has his flashes, and it’s clear he’s a work in progress. Eze needs to continue to gain experience while working on his technique and strength. It’ll take some time, but Eze has plenty of potential, and I can guarantee you his ceiling will excite many teams during this draft process.

#9. Alex Leatherwood, Alabama

Pros

  • Great frame at 6’6, 310 lbs with fantastic strength and length.
  • Deadly first punch.
  • Nice patience as a pass protector.
  • Despite drawing too many penalties in past seasons, he’s clearly become much more disciplined this season.
  • He creates massive holes in the run game when he executes correctly.
  • His experience at guard gives him versatility and a fallback plan if offensive tackle doesn’t pan out for him.

Cons

  • Poor body control/balance. When he lunges out and his balance is all out of sorts, opposing defenders use their quickness to blow by him.
  • He tends to struggle against quicker rushers.
  • Hand placement is still a little inconsistent.
  • He’s late out of his stance at times.
  • Not a smooth mover in space.
  • Doesn’t always finish plays.

Player Overview

Alex Leatherwood is a prospect that is currently putting up an impressive senior campaign at Alabama. Leatherwood’s physical attributes and eye-popping highlights prove he’s got a very high ceiling, and his ability to play guard convinces me he won’t go down as a total bust, but there’s still some flaws in Leatherwood’s game. He’s definitely got the physical attributes, along with great patience and a deadly first punch, but as I said, there’s some flaws in his game. Whether it’s the poor body control, all the way to the fact that he doesn’t always finish plays, he definitely comes with his fair share of concerns. All in all, I’m not a huge Alex Leatherwood believer, but I do see the strides he’s taken this season, and the upside with this kid is as clear as day.

#10. Tyler Vrabel, Boston College

Pros

  • Great frame at 6’5, 310 pounds with excellent length.
  • Fluid mover.
  • Decent footwork.
  • He’s strong with a good anchor.
  • Very solid hand placement.

Cons

  • Poor balance. He lunges too often.
  • Still fairly inexperienced at right tackle. He made the transition over to O-Line later in his highschool career. Vrabel is a smart guy, but his inexperience shows on occasion.
  • Tying in with his inexperience, Vrabel’s awareness at right tackle has room to improve.
  • He’s a right tackle, not a left tackle. This slightly hinders his value.

Player Overview

Tyler Vrabel, son of Tennessee Titans head coach Mike Vrabel, made the transition over to right tackle just a couple years ago. Despite this, Vrabel has picked up the position very quickly, and he’s played very well in his two seasons at Boston College. Vrabel’s got all the physical attributes to be successful, and his technique is very solid for someone who’s new to the position. As long as he continues to work on his technique and gain experience, Vrabel has nice potential at the next level.

#11. Jalen Mayfield, Michigan

Pros

  • Solid frame at 6’5, 320 lbs with good length.
  • Fairly strong.
  • Great athleticism.
  • Fluid athlete that moves well in space.
  • Great footwork.
  • He’s quick out of his snap.
  • Plays with a high motor.
  • Despite a small sample size, he played really well against high end guys such as Chase Young.

Cons

  • Poor hand placement during one on one battles loses him leverage.
  • His balance needs work.
  • Struggles on the edge against quick inside and outside moves.
  • Has allowed a lot of pressure at Michigan. This is even more concerning due to the fact that he’s a right tackle, meaning he’s mainly facing off against the second or third best pass rusher.

Player Overview

Jalen Mayfield is a player that has scouts raving over his physical tools and the way he handled Chase Young, but I’m not on the Jalen Mayfield hype train. Again, the physical attributes are there, he’s quick out of his stance, and he did play really well against Chase Young. With that being said, he only faced Young on a handful of snaps, and he was actually pretty bad in that game vs OSU, allowing 7 pressures. His flashes of excellence and physical tools suggest Mayfield has the ability to not only be a great right tackle in the NFL, but he could even slide over to left tackle and be great as well. With that being said, I feel like Mayfield is really far away from being at that level, and I’m not one of those scouts you’ll hear raving about him.

#12. Daniel Faalele, Minnesota

Pros

  • A mammoth of a man at 6’9”, 400 pounds with great length.
  • Great athleticism and mobility for his size.
  • He’s very strong, and his anchor is too.
  • Quick feet.
  • Great punch when his hand placement is correct.

Cons

  • Lacks experience. He just began playing football a few years ago, and he hasn’t played this season due to COVID concerns.
  • Hand placement is very inconsistent.
  • He plays too upright. At 6’9, this allows smaller rushers to get leverage.
  • Poor balance.
  • Football IQ needs improvement.
  • Gets beaten on the edge too often in pass protection.
  • Played right tackle at Minnesota, meaning he typically wasn’t on the opposing teams best pass rusher.

Player Overview

Daniel Faalele is a mountain of a man standing at 6’8, 400 pounds with a very lengthy wingspan. As if his physical attributes couldn’t sound any better, he’s actually a fairly sound mover in pass protection and in space, which is very encouraging. With that being said, Faalele is still new to football, so he possesses little experience and very poor technique across the board. Faalele is absolutely a boom or bust type of guy. If a team is patient and develops him to the best of their ability, and the cards fall in place, he is easily considered a high-end starting tackle in the NFL. At the same time, Faalele could also bounce around some teams as a backup for a handful of years before eventually fizzling out of the NFL. I definitely believe there’s a greater chance of him busting than there is of him booming, but the raw talent and upside is clearly there for Daniel Faalele.

#13. Abraham Lucas, Washington State

Pros

  • Great frame at 6’7, 330 lbs with solid length.
  • Decent strength.
  • Has experience in a ton of pass sets from Washington State’s air raid offense.
  • High IQ and awareness.
  • Elite footwork with a strong anchor.
  • Solid movement and athleticism for his size.
  • Great grip strength.

Cons

  • Plays too stiff. Playing stiff at 6’7 leads to small rushers getting leverage on him.
  • Fairly passive aggressive.
  • Played right tackle on Washington State in the PAC-12. This means he was typically facing PAC-12 teams second or third best pass rusher.

Player Overview

Abraham Lucas is one of the most battle-tested pass protectors in this year’s draft class. He’s performed very well in Washington State’s air raid system that includes more pass sets than nearly every team in the country. Pair that with a great frame, elite footwork, and a high-IQ, Lucas projects as a fairly high-floor guy. You know he can play right tackle (easier than left tackle), so Lucas is a fairly safe pick that I can easily see turning into a solid pro if things pan out how they should.

#14. Cole Van Lanen, Wisconsin

Pros

  • Great out of his stance. He gets out of his stance fairly quickly and generates a lot of power from it.
  • Plays with tenacity.
  • Decent mover in space.
  • Possesses good strength.
  • Awesome run blocker.

Cons

  • Wingspan isn’t ideal for a tackle.
  • Struggles when left on an island in pass protection.
  • Balance in pass protection needs improvement. 
  • Plays a little stiff.
  • Will most likely need to transition over to guard in the NFL.

Player Overview

In his time at Wisconsin, Cole Van Lanen has been a reliable left tackle for the Badgers. His quickness and power off the snap are next level, and it’s a big part of what makes him one of the best run blocking tackles in this year’s class. With that being said, I’m not sure I really trust Van Lanen as a left tackle at the next level. His wingspan is concerning, and his pass protection on an island is worrisome. If he can improve in this area, I think he’s got a shot at left tackle, but to me it feels like a transition to guard will suit him best in the NFL.

#15. Walker Little, Stanford

Pros

  • Elite athlete with fantastic lateral movement for a left tackle.
  • Moves with fluidity. He can pull across the line of scrimmage and get to the second level with ease. 
  • Great frame at 6’7, 315 pounds with favorable length and strength.
  • Plays with tenacity.
  • High IQ.
  • Excellent arm technique.
  • Great timing on punches.
  • Solid overall run blocker.

Cons

  • Poor balance against quicker pass rushers.
  • Ineffective against inside moves.
  • Plays too stiff.
  • Needs to utilize his length more effectively.
  • Could be a little quicker out of his stance.
  • Has missed the past two seasons. He suffered a season ending leg injury in the first game of the 2019-2020 season, and he opted out of the 2020-2021 season.

Player Overview

Walker Little is one of those prospects that gives you a lot of good, and a lot of bad on tape. He’s got great athleticism, an ideal frame, excellent technique, and a high IQ to pair with great tenacity. On the other hand, there are issues such as the facts that he plays too stiff, and doesn’t use his length, along with a couple other things. The two major issues to really put a sour taste in your mouth is how poor he is against inside moves from opposing defenders, and the fact that he’s missed the past two seasons is concerning. Little has shown us plenty of NFL level reps, suggesting he’s got the potential, but he’s shown me too many bad things for me to totally buy in.

#16. Jackson Carman, Clemson

Pros

  • He’s got decent height at 6’5, and his 345 pound frame is massive.
  • Great run blocker. He still has his slip ups, but he’s an overall great run blocker that can move people and pave ways for runners when he executes correctly.
  • Great technique on punches.
  • Tying in with his 345 pound frame, he’s got great strength.
  • Has done a much better job at getting out of his stance as of recently.

Cons

  • Lunges at his defender far too often in pass protection. This gets him off balance and loses him a lot of leverage.
  • Solid athleticism for his size, but he could still get better. His mobility needs to get a little better for the NFL.
  • There’s no official measurement, but it does look like his wingspan is a little small for a left tackle.
  • Footwork is still a little inconsistent.
  • Good chance he’ll have to slide over to guard in the NFL.

Player Overview

Jackson Carman is a massive man at 345 pounds, and he’s been protecting Trevor Lawrence’s blindside for the past three seasons (although he’s only started for the past two). Carman’s a great run blocker with great strength, size, and power punches. His size, strength, and experience against high-end competition gives him a good amount of upside at the left tackle position. With that being said, I wasn’t very impressed with his tape. He lunges way too often in pass protection, his wingspan is a little too short, and he’s not an amazing athlete. I see him sliding over to guard in the NFL. There’s nothing wrong with that, but tackles are more valuable than guard, so this does hurt his value in the grand scheme of things. Not too mention, he will need to become more mobile to really maximize his value if he does swing over to guard.

#17. Teven Jenkins, Oklahoma State

Pros

  • Solid frame at 6’6, 320 lbs with good length.
  • Possesses great athleticism.
  • His strength is a plus.
  • Good mover in space.
  • Can play both right and left tackle.

Cons

  • Hand placement is spotty.
  • Balance is inconsistent.
  • Lack of awareness.
  • He can be overly aggressive at times. He’s not very patient.

Player Overview

After getting overlooked coming out of high school, Teven Jenkins has put his name on the map in his time at Oklahoma State. He’s got all the physical tools to be a successful NFL tackle, whether that’s on the right or left side. With that being said, he’s got to improve on his technique and spend more time in the film room improving on his football IQ if he wants to see snaps in the NFL.

#18. Adrian Ealy, Oklahoma

Pros

  • Excellent length.
  • Elite grip strength.
  • Plays with tenacity.
  • Good awareness on the move. He’s always looking to hit someone.
  • Plenty of experience getting to the second level and playing as a pull and lead blocker.
  • Experience and both left and right tackle, although he’s more of a right tackle and I doubt he’ll play left tackle in the NFL.

Cons

  • Plays too upright. His length makes it tough to get to his chest, but when defenders do reach his chest, they often get leverage.
  • Balance is inconsistent.
  • Lunges at defenders too often.
  • His athleticism, footwork, and mobility are just average.
  • Inconsistent accuracy at the second level on blocks.
  • I still need to see more from him as a pass protector on the edge.
  • Still fairly raw despite being a fourth year senior.
  • Might have to move to guard on the edge.

Player Overview

Adrian Ealy is a lengthy, physical product out of Oklahoma. He plays with incredible tenacity, always looking to hit someone. His length makes him tough to beat on the edge despite average mobility, and his length also really negates just how fatal his upright stance could be. Ealy’s nothing special as an athlete, and his accuracy on blocks at the second level has to get better, but he has so much experience as a pull and lead guard and getting up to the second level that I believe he can do it at the next level, especially if he can become a little more fluid. Despite being a very raw fourth year player with noticeable flaws, I also like what Ealy brings to the table, and I see him as solid value towards the back-end of the draft.

#19. Rasheed Walker, Penn State

Pros

  • Good frame at 6’6, 315 lbs.
  • Great athleticism.
  • Fluid mover in pass protection and in space.
  • Refined footwork.
  • Gets out of his stance well.
  • Good overall strength.

Cons

  • Timing and technique on punches warrants more consistency.
  • Poor balance.
  • He’s got good overall strength, but improved lower body strength would really help his anchor.
  • Character concerns. He pleaded guilty to stealing a bike in 2018.

Player Overview

Rasheed Walker is an intriguing prospect out of Penn State. He’s got great athleticism, he’s fluid in space, and his refined footwork, and he’s put this on display many times at Penn State. With that being said, his technique is still raw, and I do have a little concern about his character because he pleaded guilty to stealing a bike back in 2018. 

#20. Alaric Jackson, Iowa

Pros

  • He’s quick out of his stance.
  • Great immediate technique out of his stance.
  • Good upper body strength.
  • Great grip strength.
  • Solid punch.
  • Awesome run blocker on the edge.

Cons

  • Plays with too much tightness. Not a fluid athlete.
  • Lacks length for a left tackle.
  • Doesn’t seem to understand angles very well at the second level in the run game.
  • Tough to trust on an island in pass protection. This makes me really doubt his ability to play left tackle in the NFL. There’s a good chance he’ll have to slide over to right tackle or guard.

Player Overview

Alaric Jackson has had a successful career at left tackle for the Hawkeyes who have produces an amplitude of quality NFL offensive lineman. Jackson is impressive out of his stance, and his exceptional grip strength will impress scouts as well. With that being said, I really don’t see Jackson playing left tackle in the NFL. He doesn’t have the length or fluidity to do it, and I just wouldn’t trust him on an island protecting my quarterback’s blindside. If Jackson does transition to guard, or even right tackle, he will still need to clean up some of his weaknesses, but it might be a better fit for him in the long run.

#21. Brady Christensen, BYU

Pros

  • Good frame to work with at 6’6, 300 lbs with nice length.
  • Quick out of his stance.
  • Utilizes his length well.
  • Solid hands.
  • Decent footwork in pass protection.

Cons

  • Has room to gain strength in both his upper and lower body.
  • Not very effective in space when on the move.
  • Struggles against quicker defenders.
  • Hasn’t faced high-end competition.

Player Overview

Brady Christensen has done a nice job protecting Zach Wilson’s blindisde this season at BYU. Christensen’s fairly quick out of his snap, and he’s got a blend of athleticism and technique that is nothing near stellar, but it’s solid. He’s still got to grow into his frame, and he’s not very effective in space when on the move. Not too mention, he hasn’t faced high-end competition at BYU. There’s definitely room to grow and some potential to work with, but Brady Christensen’s a fairly low risk, alright reward type of prospect.

#22. Stone Forsythe, Florida

Pros

  • Great frame at 6’9, 315 lbs with superb length.
  • Utilizes his length very well.
  • Impressive strength.
  • Good hand placement.
  • Experience as both a left and right tackle at Florida.

Cons

  • Plays with heavy feet.
  • Not an enticing athlete.
  • Due to his athletic limitations, Forsythe isn’t a great mover, and he struggles at the second level.
  • Slow kick-step and foot speed gives speed rushers an advantage on the edge against him.

Player Overview

Stone Forsythe is a big left tackle from Florida that has been killing it for the Gators this season. With an exceptional frame that he utilizes well, along with good hand placement and experience at both tackle positions, Forsythe has a lot of success as a stationary blocker. With that being said, he’s a very limited athlete. This limits his upside and his ability to play in the modern day zone blocking schemes. Not too mention, it even hurts him in pass protection against speedier pass rushers. Forsythe’s modern day fit and overall upside don’t get me excited, but if you can scheme around him a little bit and use him mainly as a stationary blocker when facing power based rushers, Forysthe could be a useful tool that could potentially become a starter if put in the perfect scheme.

#23. Landon Young, Kentucky

Pros

  • Great frame at 6’7, 325 lbs with solid length.
  • Excellent upper body strength.
  • Awesome grip strength.
  • He’s a great run blocker when he doesn’t let his flaws get in the way.
  • Racks up a ton of pancake blocks.

Cons

  • Late out of his stance too often.
  • Poor footwork.
  • Not a good mover in space.
  • Plays too upright. He gets knocked off balance too often because of this.
  • Suffered a knee injury in his junior season.

Player Overview

Landon Young is a left tackle out of Kentucky. His incredible upper body strength has allowed him to rack up a ton of eye-opening pancake blocks, and he’s got great grip strength in correlation to his upper body strength. Young’s strength is definitely put on display on many occasions, but he’s got a ton of flaws. He’s late out of his stance, his footwork is bad, he’s not an asset in space, and he plays too upright in pass protection. His great frame covers up these flaws from time to time, but it’s not nearly enough. To me, Young just simply isn’t NFL talent.

Offensive Tackle Big Board

#1. Penei Sewell, Oregon

#2. Christian Darrisaw, Virginia Tech

#3. Samuel Cosmi, Texas

#4. Rashawn Slater, Northwestern

#5. Liam Eichenberg, Notre Dame

#6. Spencer Brown, Northern Iowa

#7. Dillon Radunz, North Dakota State

#8. Obinna Eze, Memphis

#9. Alex Leatherwood, Alabama

#10. Tyler Vrabel, Boston College

#11. Jalen Mayfield, Michigan

#12. Daniel Faalele, Minnesota

#13. Abraham Lucas, Washington State

#14. Cole Van Lanen, Wisconsin

#15. Walker Little, Stanford

#16. Jackson Carman, Clemson

#17. Teven Jenkins, Oregon State

#18. Adrian Ealy, Oklahoma

#19. Rasheed Walker, Penn State

#20. Alaric Jackson, Iowa

#21. Brady Christensen, BYU

#22. Stone Forsythe, Florida

#23. Landon Young, Kentucky

2021

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